Ralph Fiennes to star as NYC titan Robert Moses in new play


That endless highway

July Fourth coming. So if you’re stuck bumper-to-bumper on the Cross Bronx, Henry Hudson or Northern State parkways, the Verrazano or Triborough, or whatever’s that Throggs Neck thing, or even the Bronx-Whitestone or if there’s a jam on the Belt Parkway because some crappy ­Edsel just broke down, do not blame lousy drivers.

The real problem is Robert Moses. This mid-20th-century master builder created our bridges, tunnels, roadways, highways and transformed metropolitan New York’s landscape. Gone now but he’s coming back. Onstage.

The play “Straight Line Crazy” stars Ralph Fiennes. Opened in London and heading here in fall. Says that for 40 years Moses — who never specialized in architecture or engineering — was NYC’s most powerful man.

Who knows, maybe the theater will stick a tollbooth in the lobby. 

Design destiny

Isaac Mizrahi. “I almost ditched making shmattas for showbiz.

“At age 8, I started doing female impersonations. 1987, I began my company. It was meteoric, and I was in every magazine. That same time I got a role in a tiny play. Small experimental theater group downtown and I wanted to throw everything away and do the production.”

He didn’t. But he sang, told stories on QVC and knocked off a one-man show. On “The Accutron” podcast he said, “No Miz-givings.” 1998, he closed his doors “to do a collection with Target.”

Fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi almost pursued a career in entertainment.
Fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi almost pursued a career in entertainment.
Photo by Taylor Hill/Getty Images for New 42

Listen, if Brad Pitt follows through on his announcement to quit acting, maybe Ralph Fiennes could play him too.


Making his case known

Dan Abrams. Lawyer. Author. ABC News chief legal analyst. On ­NewsNation weeknights 9 p.m., hosts A&E’s “Court Cam,” plus radio things daily 2 p.m., etc., etc., so:

About Pelosi upset because her San Francisco archdiocese won’t give her communion due to her abortion position? “But now it’s OK because she’s in Rome getting papal communion.”

Dan Abrams has a new book on Martin Luther King's criminal case that launched the civil rights movement.
Dan Abrams has a new book on Martin Luther King’s criminal case that launched the civil rights movement.
Photo by Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images

The Johnny Depp trial? “This effort to get back brought him more social media followers. He was down and out in Hollywood. Hard time getting jobs. Now a big following behind him is devoted to Johnny. This case was whether Amber defamed him. The thing was an embarrassment for both who hate each other. Engaged in violence. Neither of their stories hold up.”

Once he said he was wrong on a case. “Florida’s Casey Anthony trial 10 years ago. The mother accused of killing her little daughter. I thought she’d be convicted. She wasn’t. On the O.J. case when the world was shocked by the verdict — and I know you covered that trial — based on everything that happened we were not that surprised that he was acquitted.”

His new book “Alabama v. King” is on a forgotten 1956 criminal trial that sparked the civil rights movement. “Local minister, Martin Luther King, 27, was tried when 40,000 Montgomery black residents decided to boycott the buses. They happened to pick him as spokesman. Hitting the national stage for the first time is what started him.” 


Future teller

Comes now Char Margolis’ “You Are Psychic” book. Steps include: Connect with positive energy. Protect your energy. Combine logic and common sense with intuition. Discover and embrace your natural psychic abilities.

So, listen, if you’re having it lousy I’m telling you — for free — what to do to help yourself — besides ignoring Jerk Biden.


Being election time a dealer offered his local politician a sports car. The politician refused, saying: “My honor won’t permit me to accept such a gift.” Dealer: “So suppose I sell you this vehicle for $10.” A pause then the pol said: “In that case I’ll take two.”

(Maybe) only in New York, kids, only in New York.



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