Eric Adams is even more anti-‘gentrification’ than Bill de Blasio


Mayor Adams was just kidding when he claimed to be a friend of the real-estate business. His “comprehensive blueprint” to create affordable housing, which he unveiled last week, is a laugh riot. But the joke’s on us.

While his development-hating predecessor Bill de Blasio managed to at least kick-start clusters of new apartment construction here and there, Adams’ approach promises to create none at all. Ha, ha!

Adams (reasonably enough) doesn’t like de Blasio’s incremental, one-place-at-a-time strategy, which promoted zoning changes to permit new housing developments with affordable units. But Adams’ Housing Our Neighbors: A Blueprint for Housing and Homelessness plan is so short on realism and details that getting anything new built would take until the cows come home.

We should have seen it coming. Adams raised neither a finger nor a word to rescue a worthy central Harlem development plan a few weeks ago. It was scuttled by a single City Council member, Kristin Richardson Jordan, who didn’t want it in her district . . . just because.

Like former Council member Carlos Menchaca, who torpedoed a minor rezoning of Sunset Park’s Industry City in 2020, she’s a “progressive” who rejects actual progress if it means bringing new residents and new investment into her backyard.

Mayor Adams promised to turn New York into a “City of Yes” for housing and development, but so far, he has done the opposite.
Mayor Adams promised to turn New York into a “City of Yes” for housing and development, but so far, he has done the opposite.
Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/Shutterstock

The twin-tower project known as One45 on Malcolm X Boulevard and West 145th Street needed a zoning change. It would have delivered hundreds of new affordable apartments, as well as market-rate ones, along with stores and offices for local businesses, to an underused, low-rise block full of vagrants.

It’s hard to think of an easier plan to support. It needed no public funds. No one would have been evicted. It was a pure win-win for the neighborhood, which has wanted to see the block brought back to life forever.

City Council member Kristin Richardson Jordan shot down a central Harlem development plan a few weeks ago, a pure win-win for her neighborhood — and Adams didn’t stop her.
City Council member Kristin Richardson Jordan shot down the central Harlem development One45 a few weeks ago, a pure win-win for her neighborhood — and Adams didn’t stop her.
LightRocket via Getty Images

Despite Richardson Jordan’s snit, Adams had plenty of cover to go to bat for One45. The mayor can’t overrule a rezoning vote but neither is he without influence. The plan was endorsed by the City Planning Commission, Manhattan Borough President Mark Levine and Harlem business leaders.

But for Richardson Jordan, it wasn’t enough that half of the 900 apartments would be cheap — she insisted that they all be, an economically impossible demand that would, if applied everywhere, result in exactly no affordable units being built at all. But for race-baiting demagogues, standing up to “gentrification” trumps any practical benefits to a community.

Council member Carlos Menchaca, who torpedoed a minor rezoning of Sunset Park’s Industry City in 2020.
Council member Carlos Menchaca, who torpedoed a minor rezoning of Sunset Park’s Industry City in 2020, is another “progressive” who rejects actual progress if it means bringing new investment into his backyard.
Taidgh Barron/NY Post

Hizzoner’s refusal to get involved ominously suggests he’s even more anti-“gentrification” than de Blasio was — and more than we wanted to believe.

Although earlier this month, while laying out a plan to support small businesses, create affordable housing, and promote sustainability, Adams said: “We are going to turn New York into a ‘City of Yes’ — yes in my backyard, yes on my block, yes in my neighborhood,” his other remarks tell the real story.

While campaigning last year, he told a Harlem crowd, “Go back to Iowa, you go back to Ohio. New York City belongs to the people that were here and made New York City what it is.” Adams, who is not anti-white at all, nonetheless borrowed from Al Sharpton’s “white interlopers” 1980s rhetoric to fire up a crowd.

The $2 billion Innovation QNS in Astoria is headed for a Council vote. If Adams truly wants to support housing and development in NYC, he should push to make it happen.
The $2 billion Innovation QNS in Astoria is headed for a Council vote. If Adams truly wants to support housing and development in NYC, he should push to make it happen.

He gave away the game in a Juneteenth rant this month about protecting black neighborhoods. He ridiculously equated gentrification with slavery — and to the forced removal of the black community known as Seneca Village from what’s now Central Park in the 1800s.

Another big test for Adams is looming. A $2 billion project in Astoria called Innovation QNS is headed for a Council vote. Its impermissible sin, in opponents’ eyes, is that “only” 25% of 2,800 apartments would be affordable.

If the plan goes down in flames the way One45 did, we’ll know who to blame: our mayor who wants New York to be the “City of Yes” — unless one neighborhood crank says no.

[email protected]



Source link

Comments are closed.