Easy abortion access has created a ‘black apocalypse’


Recently, CNN ran a piece titled “Black women say they are invisible in abortion rights fight: ‘We are still forgotten within all of this.’” 

The piece, which highlights the stories of five black women who had abortions, said the reversal of Roe v. Wade “stripped [many black women] of bodily autonomy” and “created another barrier to economic security and choosing the course of their future.” Widespread abortion access, it said, has “especially benefited black women who continue to fight for an equal place in the US.”

But how can abortion access benefit black females when it so starkly impacts black babies – half of them girls? Indeed, of the roughly 930,000 abortions performed in the United States each year, about 38 percent are performed on black women. In other words, there are about 353,000 black babies aborted every year, 968 every day, 40 every hour, and one every minute and a half. Overall, some 24 million black babies have been aborted since Roe v. Wade in 1973.

I call this an abortion apocalypse — each act the taking of an innocent human life.

Alveda King hugging then-President Donald Trump during a visit to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in 2017. King came to Trump's defense when he as accused of racism during his presidency.
Alveda King hugging then-President Donald Trump during a visit to the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in 2017. King came to Trump’s defense when he was accused of racism during his presidency.
Kevin Dietsch/CNP/startraksphoto
The King family gathered for a photograph during Thanksgiving 1963. Standing at the far left is Martin Luther King, Jr. alongside wife Coretta Scott King. Alveda is seated center, holding her cousin Isaac Newton Farris, Jr.
The King family gathered for a photograph during Thanksgiving 1963. Standing at the far left is Martin Luther King, Jr. alongside wife Coretta Scott King. Alveda is seated center, holding her cousin Isaac Newton Farris, Jr.

Racial prejudice is nothing new to the abortion movement. Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, was one of the most vocal advocates for eugenics in America. In fact, she wrote in 1921 that eugenics was “the most adequate and thorough avenue to the solution of racial, political and social problems.” 

A century after Sanger’s words, we should ask ourselves how much has changed in the pro-abortion movement.  Today, a heavily disproportionate number of Planned Parenthood clinics are located in or near minority neighborhoods.

Alveda King outside the White House in 2019 following a meeting with then-Pres. Donald Trump. King still supports Trump and has been a vocal critic of Vice President Kamala Harris.
Alveda King outside the White House in 2019 following a meeting with then-Pres. Donald Trump. King still supports Trump and has been a vocal critic of Vice President Kamala Harris.
Ron Sachs – CNP/MEGA
AD King, brother of Martin Luther King, Jr. (second from left) sits with his family including daughter Alveda (second from right), who is also a reverend and pastor like her iconic uncle.
AD King, brother of Martin Luther King, Jr. (second from left) sits with his family including daughter Alveda (second from right), who is also a reverend and pastor like her iconic uncle.

Although they make up just 13 percent of the female population, black women account for over one-third of all abortions performed in this country each year. In some places, like New York City, there are actually more black abortions in some years than black live births.

There’s a number of reasons for these numbers — including fatherlessness, poverty, a lack of decent educational options and low marriage rates. Which is why a crucial part of ending this abortion epidemic begins with fixing the black family. At a time when most black children are being raised by single mothers, we need to encourage marriage and prioritize fatherhood. School choice can help too, so that black children stuck in failing inner-city schools can see a way out of failure and into a more successful future. 

King speaking at the the fourth annual Virginia March for Life in April in Richmond, Va. She sees a direct correlation between the high number of abortions by black women and the low African-American marriage rates.
King speaking at the the fourth annual Virginia March for Life in April in Richmond, Va. She sees a direct correlation between the high number of abortions by black women and the low African-American marriage rates.
AP
King says Planned Parenthood locates their clinics in urban areas to make it easier for black woman to obtain abortions. Black women have the highest percentage of abortions of any American ethnic group.
King says Planned Parenthood locates their clinics in urban areas to make it easier for black woman to obtain abortions. Black women have the highest percentage of abortions of any American ethnic group.
William Farrington

If CNN wants to hear more black female voices, they could start with me. In 1950, my mother was considering an abortion when my grandaddy convinced her that I was a human life. I was saved from abortion that day, and I believe God has commissioned me to raise my voice in defense of life.

The pro-life movement believes that Civil Rights begin in the womb, and the American Dream is a dream for all Americans— including the unborn. It’s a dream I learned first-hand from my uncle, Martin Luther King, Jr. Although he died before abortion was legalized, people often wonder how MLK would feel about abortion. I think some insight can be revealed from his own words: “The Negro cannot win if he is willing to sacrifice the futures of his children for immediate personal comfort and safety. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

As a nation, we must stand up to the radical left and their goal of taxpayer-funded abortions all the way up until birth. And we must continue to pray with faith, hope, love and compassion that all Americans come to cherish life for all God’s children, from the womb to the tomb.

Dr. Alveda King serves as Chair for the America First Policy Institute’s Center for the American Dream.



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